Archive for the ‘networking’ Category

Using Twitter – 8 Tips – Part Three

June 4, 2014

online marketing, facebook marketing, linkedin, twitter for marketingI have written two (2) blog articles about my journey using Twitter.  The first was for beginners called “Do you Tweet?“.  I followed this with a Part Two.  A lot of business owners set up their Twitter accounts and then they get frustrated with trying to figure it out.  I bought a Twitter for Dummies book which was very helpful.

Initially, I followed other women business owners.  I went to trade organization meeting for women business owners and we were all encouraged to follow one another.  Well, it is great to support one another.  These follows make increase your business website traffic too.  However, at the end of the day, you need to ask yourself if the folks you are following and the folks that follow you back are best for your business growth and development.

I joined Twitter in 2009.  Last year, I began to lose interest in this social media site all together.  I would scroll through tweets by folks I was following and very little seemed to matter to me with regard to my business’ growth.

Then, on Facebook, someone posted how he was really reaching key business leads and sending them pitches.  He was getting appointments and making deals.  I had an “Aha” moment.  My problem was that many of the folks I was following and who followed me were not my ideal business targets.

Here are eight (8) tips:

  1. Be clear on what you are passionate about – – state this in your Twitter profile and photo images
  2. Be clear to identify products and services that you want to sell that are in alignment with what your passions
  3. Draft a list of ideal prospective clients — I have listed ours on our website
  4. Use the Twitter search tool to find your ideal folks and follow them – – be very selective on who you decide to follow

Read more

Clovia Hamilton, MBA JD – President

Lemongrass Consulting Inc.

(c) 2014. All Rights Reserved. Lemongrass Consulting Inc.

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10 Tips for Professional Speakers – 50 heads is better than one!

May 30, 2013

brainstorming techniques, brainstorming ideas, using linkedinI conduct training seminars.  It can be ebb and flow.  I reached ebb and decided to reach out to my Linkedin connections and forge a massive brain storm.  Well, as great fortune would have it, I am connected to some of the most awesome, brightest minds in the world!  Out of 1,500 of my Linkedin connections, 50 had very dynamic ideas for me to try.  The response is not bad given the Memorial Day weekend.  Reaching out to your Linkedin network for ideas is a great brainstorming technique!

Although feedback is still coming in, so far, I have developed a 10 page checklist of organizations to connect with; people to contact; and things to do.  It’s very exciting!

My daughter complains that I am always looking for things to get into.   She says I am very, very good at creating work for us all.  Well, if you are like me and want to stir things up, just reach out to folks in your network for ideas and tips for business.

Here is an overview of my 10 pages of notes.  Many of these things I already do.  Some, I have to work on.   Here are 10 Tips for Professional Speakers:

  1. Have both a Speaker One Sheet document and a Speaker web page that is easy to view from mobile devices.   Be sure to showcase yourself as a really dynamic, entertaining speaker!
  2. Even if you can teach a variety of topics, develop an overall theme.  People like to categorize speakers into niches.
  3. Be ready to share video links of past speaking engagements.
  4. Join speakers’ bureaus and speakers’ associations.

Read more

By Clovia Hamilton, President

Lemongrass Consulting Inc.

Approaching Sales with Positivity – Building a 10 Step Sales System

February 12, 2012

If you have been following my online posts over the years, you know that my least favorite thing to do in business is sales. My favorite tasks are marketing, research, writing, and customer service. But, there’s one thing we all know for sure. Without sales, there is no business.

Another thing I know for sure is that if we keep telling ourselves how much we dislike something, we will never learn how to do it and we will never see the good in it. So, this year I have a new mantra. This year, I am determined to be a better sales person. My focus is shifting because I am reminding myself that:

  • Sales is a way to connect with great folks and build great, long lasting relationships!
  •  These folks have needs that our products and services can meet!
  • Sales-Time is Fun-Time! Rah Rah!

The key for me is to make it a fun, social activity rather than drudgery.  This takes me back to when I was a kid and helped with a political campaign for a Chicago alderman.  I worked the phones.  I mailed things out.  What I enjoyed most was the whirl of activity and positive energy. So, I create a whirl of activity much like a political campaign room. Here’s how I do it:

  • First, I start with my contacts list.
  • Second, I visit the person’s website to see where we have synergy. I ask myself what products and services my firm offers that might help this person out.
  • Third, if I am connected with the person online in Facebook, Linkedin or Twitter, I reach out to them for an appointment.
  • Fourth, if I am not connected with the person online, I send them a friend request on Facebook, an invitation on Linkedin, and/or follow them on Twitter …and then, ask for an appointment.

Where’s the fun in this? The challenge is to “get in there”. Social media provides valuable access and a peep into my new friend’s world.

  • Fifth, I schedule two mailings. On this day, I mail out a post card. I also print a customized cover letter, relevant flyers, a brochure, and business card to mail out 2 days following the post card. I prepare it and lay it in my desk calendar on the day that it needs to get mailed. I use a desk calendar that has loose daily sheets in a 3 ring binder.

So far, I have completed about 3 touches with this person.

  • Sixth, I schedule a phone call for one (1) week out. The key for me is the scheduling. I use a form and list the folks that I need to call.
  • Seventh, if I have not talked to the person yet, I make the scheduled call. Yes, it’s a sales call. But, no – it’s not a “cold call”. Now, it’s a “warm call”. Now, I feel ok about it because we know a bit about each other. I’m getting further in there!
  • Eighth, I visit the person if they are local. I either meet them at their office or join them at a restaurant. I bring another packet of information and a promotional gift.
  • Ninth, I send a thank you note card.

Now, I have completed 6 touches with this person.

I keep the system physically very organized. I have a long sales table in my office. It contains a contacts binder with my contact list. My table contains address labels, envelopes, presentation folders, stamps, post cards, brochures, flyers, thank you note cards, business cards, and promotional items (small candy filled jars, tea lite candles, mini-calendars). I’m ready to crank it out!

  • Tenth, I send a retainer agreement. This is the 7th touch. I let them know that there is no obligation or pressure, but I would love to help them out. I list the products and services that are relevant to what we discussed.

My contacts database has about 7500 people and it grows whenever I attend trade meetings and other events. It also grows when I work on a sales campaign idea and build or buy a list of contacts that are ideal to pitch to. The key for me is to not feel overwhelmed by the numbers. I spend a few hours each morning on sales. I am usually up at 3am. I will buzz about, have fun, and plow through my list until coffee time at 6am. I do not really have a numbers goal. I just do as much as I can in 3 hours – which is pretty substantial.

The old saying is customers first, then sales first, then marketing. I am most energetic first thing in the morning. So, I do sales first. I reserve the 9 to 5 for work. Most of my marketing is online using social media and I do that at night from my bed. I write all of the government contracting bid proposals that are due the upcoming week on the weekend. I pick 3 to 5 to submit each week. Know your biorhythm and implement routines that work best for you and your lifestyle. But, be consistent and work on it every day. Having a sales system in place is also critical if you want to scale and grow. Now, you can easily train others to pitch in, follow your system, and help you with your firm’s sales.

What is your sales routine?

By Clovia Hamilton, President, Lemongrass Consulting, Inc.

Clovia founded Lemongrass Consulting in 2005 with nearly 30 years of government work experience and has served as a procurement counselor in the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center (GTPAC). Lemongrass Consulting provides strategic planning solutions including organizational assessments, government contracting strategic marketing plans, intellectual property, social media marketing strategic plans, and other services.

Contact Clovia at:
■ Web: http://www.lemongrassplanning.com/
■ Follow us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/lemongrass-consulting-inc.
■ Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/lemongrassplans

■ LIKE us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LemongrassConsultingInc

12 Ideas you can get when Visiting your Connections’ Websites

November 13, 2011

Google image via dailygreen.com

We recently went through a lead scoring exercise. It was time consuming, but worth it. We scored 7500 contacts. The process required checking out our contacts’ website. I highly recommend that you get in the habit of visiting your contacts’ website “before” friending on Facebook, connecting on Linkedin, following on Twitter, or otherwise chatting with a new contact. It’s a great way to get a glimpse at what your contacts are up to.

Whenever we saw information or website features we liked, we’d save them as samples. We made good use of our Snipping Tool to save jpeg images of what we liked.

Here are 12 ideas you can get when visiting your connections’ websites:

1. Website Design and Branding Ideas –
a. Landing Pages
b. Page tabs
c. Photos
d. Capability Statements, Resumes, Bios
e. Media kits
f. Ways to display testimonials
g. Shopping Carts

2. Trade Organizations to check out
3. Periodicals to Subscribe to
4. Business books to buy
5. Case studies and white papers to post
6. Social Media ideas
7. Press release ideas
8. Referral networks to join
9. Hiring ideas – look at the structure of their teams; their organization chart – what positions should you hire? Some of my contacts had speaking agents and PR (press/media) assistants.
10. Business Award program ideas
11. Business events to host
12. Affiliate programs

Gathering ideas from the websites of folks in your network is gathering business intelligence.  Competitive intelligence is the legal and ethical acts of systematically gathering, analyzing, and managing information about business competitors.  Well, many of the folks in your network may not be competitors.  In fact, many business owners mistakenly avoid connecting with their competitors.  When gathering competitive intelligence, businesses gather their competitors’ news articles, publications, patent filings, trade show marketing materials, and other market research.

Some business owners may perceive business intelligence as espionage or spying.  I see it as getting to know the folks in your network better.  The more you know about the folks in your network, the better you can forge strategic alliances and the better choices you can make about the type of relationship you should build with each person in your network.

There are far too many businesses engaged in social media marketing that do not take the time to study their network.  Besides learning more about each organization you are now connected to, why not take away some ideas that may benefit your own organization?

By Clovia Hamilton, President, Lemongrass Consulting, Inc.
Clovia founded Lemongrass Consulting in 2005 with nearly 30 years of government work experience and serves as a procurement counselor in the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center (GTPAC). Lemongrass Consulting provides strategic planning solutions including government contracting strategic marketing plans, intellectual property, social media marketing strategic plans, and other services. Contact Clovia at:
■ Web: http://www.lemongrassplanning.com/
■ Blog: https://cloviahamilton.wordpress.com/
■ LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/cloviahamilton
■ Twitter: http://twitter.com/lemongrassplans
■ Email: chamilton@lemongrassplanning.com

15 Lead Scoring Points to Use

September 4, 2011

via Google Images

We are in the process of revamping our contacts database to include a new Lead Scoring system. It’s “very” time consuming. But, we are certain it will pay off in the end. I have read quite a bit about various lead scoring systems. I am convinced that it is a must do for organizations.

The idea is that you give folks a point for various activities and facts that you value about them. Folks with higher scores should get more of your attention with respect to prospecting for sales; and promotional and other outreach. I am tickled by the concept because many, many years ago my brother had a scoring system for his personal contacts. He was an accountant and he kept an accounting ledger about people. He gave folks points for helping him out, remembering his birthday, hanging out with him, etc. One year he bought me a new tv set because I was so good to him. I thought it was weird to be so anal. But, you really should treat your advocates best.

We are painstakingly checking out every single one of our contacts online. So much changes over time – and especially due to the down economy. Some folks have moved on to new positions. So far, two of our contacts got in trouble with the law. Yikes! So, needless to say, they were removed from our list!

Here are 15 items that get points in our lead scoring system:

1. Connected on Linked
2. Connected on Twitter
3. Connected on Facebook
4. Has LIKED our Facebook business page
5. Located in our Target geographic markets
6. An INC 1000 firm
7. Opened our emails
8. Luv’d our business on Intuit’s LUV a business page
9. Commented on our wordpress blog
10. Subscribes to our wordpress blog
11. We have talked or corresponded online
12. Registered for a Seminar
13. Downloaded our ebook or other documents from our website
14. Subscribes to our Newsletter
15. Current or past customer

As you can see, conversation and dialogue is very important to what we do. Social interaction expands our scope and reach.

What items would you add to the list?

 

By Clovia Hamilton, President, Lemongrass Consulting, Inc.
Clovia founded Lemongrass Consulting in 2005 with nearly 30 years of government work experience and serves as a procurement counselor in the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center (GTPAC). Lemongrass Consulting provides strategic planning solutions including government contracting strategic marketing plans, intellectual property, social media marketing strategic plans, and other services. Contact Clovia at:
■ Web: http://www.lemongrassplanning.com/
■ Blog: https://cloviahamilton.wordpress.com/
■ LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/cloviahamilton
■ Twitter: http://twitter.com/lemongrassplans
■ Email: chamilton@lemongrassplanning.com

Five (5) ways to increase your business network

May 31, 2011

I network pretty extensively. I think it is more important than ever to do so during the down economy. When the economy improves and we get busier with work, the amount of time available to devote to networking may diminish. Nevertheless, I am a firm believer in daily marketing and networking.

I am not connected to tens of thousands of people. But, I like to think that the folks I am connected to are real people. When you pay for followers or connect with just anyone, they will likely be fake people or market researchers. I have a small but influential network. I am often asked how I consistently make new connections.

The answer is that I put time into it. It is really that simple. Here are three things I do routinely to increase my business network:

1. Meetings – I invite business people that I meet and dialogue with to join my Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin networks. I send the invitations out as soon as possible. I usually try to get to it within a week of meeting each person. I may meet these connections at trade organization luncheons, trade conferences, training programs, or meetings I coordinated to pitch a service offering.
2. Trade Articles – I let article writers know when I enjoyed an article they wrote. I then invited them to join my Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin networks. I subscribe to Black Enterprise, the Atlanta Tribune, Home Business and Entrepreneurs magazines. I also subscribe to several free electronic news services for business articles. I am particularly interested in business strategy and government contracting. When these news emails arrive, I put them in a folder called Read Me Later. When I have down time, I go through the lists of articles and pdf the ones that I want to read. I then read through them once a week. If I enjoy an article, I immediately go online and post a comment; and I also search for the author on Facebook and try to connect with them.
3. Winners’ Circles – I like to connect with small business owners that win awards and contracts. I learn a great deal from the winners. They obviously have a winning strategy. I find them on Facebook and I congratulate them. I then introduce myself and tell them about my company and that I teach government contracting for the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center. I connect with a lot of great minority owned and women owned small business leaders with this strategy.
4. Alum – I also connect with folks I went to elementary school, high school, college, and graduate school with. I use my old year books. I also peek at each of their online connections to see if there is anyone I remember. You never know where a referral will come from. I think my relationship with school chums is that we will always have that shared experience – i.e. the old neighborhoods, the campuses, and the faculty. These folks are a true extension of my family.
5. Past Colleagues – I worked primarily as a government civil servant for more than 25 years at the federal, state and local government levels. Over the years, I have come to know quite a few really cool folks and have stayed in touch with them. I seek pass co-workers out online and send them invitations to connect.

What about the competition? I have also been asked why I allow competitors into my network. I learn from some competitors and I hope they learn from the information I share online. I realize that some competitors will try to get at your customers via Linkedin, Facebook and Twitter. So, to be honest with you, I am not connected to my core customers online to prevent that from happening. I stay in touch with my core customers with email, direct mail, and visits.

Clovia founded Lemongrass Consulting in 2005 with 25 years of government work experience and serves as a procurement counselor in the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center (GTPAC). Lemongrass Consulting provides strategic planning solutions including government contracting strategic marketing plans. Visit us at: http://www.lemongrassplanning.com – Follow Clovia on Twitter @lemongrassplans and LIKE Lemongrass on Facebook at http://tinyurl.com/6cuu28o

Do you Tweet? Part Two.

May 15, 2011

This time last year, I wrote an article called Do you Tweet? I completed two Social Media classes in 2009 and decided to use social media online marketing as an affordable way to build my network. It’s working. My network has steadily grown. I went to a trade conference recently and folks recognized me when in many cases, I did not recognize them. Online marketing increases your visibility and helps you achieve “presence of mind” when it comes to getting referrals. This article serves to update you the new tools and techniques I am trying.
Last year I wrote how I spend a minimum (and usually maximum) of 5 minutes in the morning and 5 minutes at night each day. Now, I spend more time. I usually devote a few hours on Saturday or Sunday. Here’s what I do with Twitter now:
You get followers by following others. If someone does not follow me in about a week or so, I stop following them.
How do I find followers and get folks to follow me?
1) I still get great twitter connections from my linkedin and facebook groups.
2) I upload a *.csv (comma separated value) file from linkedin into twitter to make sure I am following my Linkedin connections out on Twitter – and to encourage them to follow me back.
3) I look at every new Facebook connections’ information page to find out if they have a twitter account – if so, I follow them and email them to request that they follow me back. I also check out their website. I always do my due diligence to find out whether a Facebook invite or recommended connection is a good fit in my circle or space.
Why do I love Twitter?
1) It helps me direct traffic to my website. We have had an increase of website visitors as per our Google Analytics reports. I review our analytics monthly.
a. With each twitter follow, I use the Twitter Direct mail feature to send them an email:
i. thanks 4 the follow! I look forward to getting to know u! Free ebook gift for u: 25 Small Biz Tips: http://tinyurl.com/35rtl7e
ii. please support our Facebook biz page by clicking on the Like link & Join My List link – http://tinyurl.com/6cuu28o
b. Each week I usually post a blog post and convert the post into articles. I then tweet the new arrival of a blog post and use auto notifiers to post the articles. This helps drive traffic to my website.
c. I have begun to post videos via YouTube, and photos using Twitpic.
How do I save time?

Well, last year I was using ping fim to post each morning. Now I use Hootesuite and schedule about 50 posts each week. I post about 7 times per day. I set up 2 or 3 posts in the morning, noon, and night. I use the ping fm feature in Hootesuite to distribute my posts to a number of social media outlets – myspace, linkedin, my personal facebook page, my company’s facebook like page, and other pages. I love the schedule ahead feature in Hootesuite.
Last year, in my Do you Tweet article I listed a number of news outlets that I subscribe to in order to read and cull out content to share online. This year, I have finally graduated to using Twitterfeed to share posts from my favorite blogs. At first I used their default of posting every 30 minutes. One of my cousins advised me that it seemed like I was posting on Twitter every minute and that was annoying. I went from about 7 posts per day to who knows what. So, I had to go back into Twitterfeed and adjust the settings.
I signed up for Gist and have begun to see dossiers on folks in my network. This helps me decide who to conversate with. But, I honestly lean more toward the Hootesuite mention feature to see who retweets my post or asks me questions. I can then easily respond. Gist is more comprehensive since it will show me my online connections’ posts in several outlets. But I will have to hire someone to help me make the most of that. It would be neat if all of this could be rolled into Hootesuite so that I could see everything on one website. If you know of a way, please let me know.
The key is to continue to try new marketing tactics. Post diverse things and use a variety of tools to stay fresh and interesting. No matter how much we small business owners do, we can always do more. You cannot get frustrated and quit. You simply build the empire one stone at a time with patience and persistence.

Clovia founded Lemongrass Consulting in 2005 with 25 years of government work experience and serves as a procurement counselor in the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center (GTPAC). Lemongrass Consulting provides strategic planning solutions including government contracting strategic marketing plans. Visit us at: http://www.lemongrassplanning.com – Follow Clovia on Twitter @lemongrassplans and LIKE Lemongrass on Facebook at http://tinyurl.com/6cuu28o

How to Get the Most out of Conferences

July 5, 2010

How to get the most out of conferences

July 5, 2010 by Clovia Hamilton

Lemongrass Consulting advocates strategic planning.  I lead this charge and I advocate strategic planning in all things that we do – including conference attendance.

As a procurement counselor at the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center (GTPAC), I give vendors notices about upcoming business to government (B2G) conferences routinely.  I also give advice on how to prepare for conferences and for following up after a conference.

Recently Beth Goldstein posted an article “To Get the Most Out of Conferences, Follow Up” in Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s smallbiz tips.  Beth states that the goal is to make solid connections.  Beth advocates that conference attendants should:

  • Thank the connection
  • Send the connection an article
  • Invite the connection to an upcoming event
  • Send the connection a copy of your newsletter
  • Introduce the connection to your other connections

The topic of what to do with business cards has been underway in the Linked in Woman 2 Woman Business Group.  Here are some suggestions that I like from this discussion:

  • Use a virtual assistant to help you add names into a contacts database (Jennifer Dixon)
  • Write a note about the person, the date, and the event on the business card (Eileen J Kennedy, Nanci Benefiel)
  • Follow up with the person you met the next day or within the next few days (Eileen J Kennedy)
  • Use Microsoft Outlook contacts and sync your Blackberry to Outlook (Eileen J Kennedy)
  • Scan business cards into your email address book as Vcards (Louise Leduc)
  • Invite your connections to Linkedin and your newsletter (Diane S Turner)
  • Keep business cards in clear plastic sheets (Gwen McCauley)
  • Select a few networking groups that you attend routinely (Nanci Benefiel)
  • Send the connection a greeting card (Gayle McKearin, Mary Kathryn Ewart, or Send Out Cards per Nanci Benefiel)

I noted in this discussion the importance of leaving white space on the back of your business card and do not use glossy card stock that cannot be written on.

I do all of the above – and I sort cards by the first name of the connection and keep the clear plastic sheets in a binder with alpha dividers A thru Z.  I also make copies of cards of potential teaming partners and keep them in a binder sorted by dividers labeled for each type of potential teaming endeavor we might pursue.

Try to connect with everyone or just a few?

Stephanie Robertson and Diane Turner stated that she usually only has 2-4, or 3-5 people that they connect with.  I have been advised by mentors to set a goal for 3 people.  This approach is to promote quality over quantity.

While the 3 people goal may be productive and may keep you from feeling overwhelmed, I have learned over the years that you will never know where your next lead, prospect, or referral will come from.  So, I try to meet as many people as possible. I do not devalue anyone.  I try to connect with as many folks as possible.  This is not really shotgunning – because out of the batch, I will target a few to follow up with immediately.

Clovia founded Lemongrass Consulting in 2005 with 25 years of government work experience and serves as a procurement counselor in the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center (GTPAC). Lemongrass Consulting provides strategic planning solutions including government contracting strategic marketing plans. Visit us at: http://www.lemongrassplanning.com – Follow Clovia on Twitter @lemongrassplans and LIKE Lemongrass on Facebook at http://tinyurl.com/6cuu28o

Do you Tweet?

June 14, 2010

I completed two Social Media classes a year or so ago. My first thought was: “who has time for this?” I also, thought that if you are always on the web, when will you have time to do your work?

Well, I decided to try Linkedin, Twitter and Facebook. I had accounts since 2005, but never put them to any real use.

When the economy took a nose dive, I had to get out “there” and market my services to try to earn a living. Online marketing can be free and it’s a great way to stay present on the minds of potential buyers or to stay well connected to achieve “presence of mind” when it comes to getting referrals.

I spend a minimum (and usually maximum) of 5 minutes in the morning and 5 minutes at night each day. Here’s what I do with Twitter:

You get followers by following others. If someone does not follow you in about a week or so, then stop following them.

How to find followers:

1) ask your linkedin and facebook groups: “Do you tweet? If so, what is your twitter address”
a. then use the search tool in twitter to find them
i. be careful – don’t click on any links because they could be a dangerous to infiltrate your computer with worms, viruses, trojans, etc…
ii. instead type it into twitter search and if the link shows up, click on it and then click follow
b. then follow them (click Follow)
2) type keywords for topics that interest you in the twitter search box
a. then check out folks’ profile pages
b. if you like their tweets, then click follow to follow them
3) use twellow to search for folks to follow using keywords for topics that interest you
4) follow other folks’ followers if you have similar interests – eg find the coaches that follow me and follow them

How to get folks to follow you:

1) usually folks will follow folks that follow them (reciprocal following)
2) you need to have a balance of followers (ie your followers number) and folks you follow (ie your following number) – or you will be viewed as a spammer
a. so be sure to check weekly or monthly if the folks you follow are following you back
b. if they are not following you back, then stop following them
c. but bare in mind that trade orgs and news outlets may not follow you back. Nevertheless, I keep these because I want their content

What to do if someone follows you:

1) you’ll get an email
2) use the Direct Messages feature in your twitter Home page (off the right) to thank the person who is following you …be careful about not posting your personal messages for everyone to see …I love Direct messaging because only that one person will see it
a. usually if you reply and acknowledge a follower, that will solidify your relationship and they wont stop following you
b. I post “Thank you for the follow (or follow back)! I look forward to your tweets! You can learn more about me at http://www.lemongrassplanning.com
c. Always try to get them to visit your website …you can also direct them to a free gift or a blog post on your website

What and How to post:

1) Each post can only be 140 characters
2) DON’T post hard sales “buy this” or “hire us”
3) DO try to get folks to your website
a. Send a notice when your constant contact newsletter is available
b. Send a notice with each new blog post on your website
c. Send notices about videos on youtube
d. Send notices about freebies
e. Send notices about events
4) I use ping fm (http://ping.fm/) to post once each morning to twitter, linkedin, and facebook by email
a. Ping fm will give you an email address
b. You email your message to the ping fm email address and the message will get posted wherever you want it to
5) You can preset posts to automatically go out using tweetdeck or hootsuite
6) Share content – go for just one main topic
a. Famous quotes
i. just google “famous quotes” for websites
ii. search with keywords
iii. collect into a word document
b. events
c. awards
d. Articles
i. If you post articles, use tiny url (http://tinyurl.com/) to convert the longer url where folks can find the article
ii. Sources of articles – sign up to get articles emailed to you
1. NAWBO (and other trade organizations)
2. forbes and forbes woman
3. Entrepreneur.com Small Business News and Updates
4. Inc mag
5. Smartbrief on Social Media
6. Smartbrief on Entrepreneurs
7. Smartbrief on Leadership
8. NFIB Smartbrief
9. Businessweek’s Small Biz Insider

Clovia founded Lemongrass Consulting in 2005 with 25 years of government work experience and serves as a procurement counselor in the Georgia Tech Procurement Assistance Center (GTPAC). Lemongrass Consulting provides strategic planning solutions including government contracting strategic marketing plans. Visit us at: http://www.lemongrassplanning.com – Follow Clovia on Twitter @lemongrassplans and LIKE Lemongrass on Facebook at http://tinyurl.com/6cuu28o